Sunday, November 11, 2007

Veteran's Day

We celebrate Veteran's Day in the US today, November 11. Tomorrow is a day off for State and Federal employees. I don't remember having this day off when I worked at the Employment Office, but I suppose I did.

Today I think of my Father and his service to the country in World War II. He was the oldest of 6 children. Three boys and three girls. He joined the Navy right out of high school at the age of 17 in 1942 and I am certain that that young boy returned home a man. He had two younger brothers who followed in his footsteps. I always liked to hear him talk about his time in the Navy and see the pictures of him in his white uniform. I still have a pair of his wool navy sailor pants someplace.

His father, who he was named for, was born on this day, November 11, 1900. I called him Paw-paw and he was the sweetest little man with a strong, small frame. I can't think of him without seeing that smile that wrinkled up his eyes each time. So Happy Birthday to you Paw-paw. I'm thinking of you today, too, and all the veterans around the land.

4 comments:

Shirl said...

oh thank you for remembering. My dad went in at 18 in 1944, a week after graduation. They definitely came back men, those boys of WWII.

Sujaco said...

Thanks for your input, Shirl. I think that makes your dad born in 1926. Mine was born in 1924. WWII molded and defined many good men. It must have been a frightening time when our country was attacked in Pearl Harbor and we had an enemy to fight with a specific location. Everyone got behind it.

Shirl said...

the only thing is . . . so many of them died young. Dad never talked of his war experiences. He was at the end of the Bulge, and then on the march into Germany.

Sujaco said...

Actually, Daddy wasn't specific when talking about the Navy. Men didn't talk about much of anything back then, you know? He talked about guys he was on the ship with and things they did on the ship and places they ported. Always kept it light. I guess they faced a different kind of threat being in the water than those soldiers who were on the ground.